Tuna Tackle For Beginners: 5 Lures you’ll Love

Tuna are a highly migratory species that can be found around the world⁠—from New Zealand to Nova Scotia and North Carolina to Mexico. There are several species of tuna, varying in size, weight, characteristics, and location. This means that fishing techniques and tuna tackle may also differ depending on these variables and more. If you plan to try your hand at tuna fishing, here is a list of five sure-catch lures to include on your tuna tackle shopping list.

1.    Skirted Trolling Lures

There are many styles of trolling lures from jet heads to chuggers. The bright-colored skirts and metallic features create movement and shine that attract tuna. Rig with ballyhoo or other baits for a more realistic profile.

2.    Diving Lures

Tuna are often found 60 to 100 feet below the surface. When it comes to tuna tackle, add a lipped lure to your trolling spread that will dive deep into tuna territory.

3.    Feather Lures

Lures with a polished, metal head and long, colorful feathers create “smoke” in the water that almost always urge a strike.

4.    Cedar Plugs

A secret weapon in a tuna fishing tackle arsenal, tuna can’t resist the swimming action of these solid wood plugs. Soak in a bait scent for extra effectiveness.

5.    Topwater Plugs

When tuna are busting bait at the surface, tie on a topwater lure and cast into the frenzy. Use a topwater plug or try a popper for extra-attractive water movement

Remember, the lure is the key to getting any fish to bite, but the only way you’ll know is to get out and try different styles of tuna fishing tackle until you find the fishing lures that work best for you. Nothing beats experience! Before you head out, be sure your fishing license is up-to-date get your fishing license online. Tight lines!


Alycia Downs

Alycia Downs

Alycia Downs is a freelance content creator and avid sportsman who contributes to numerous publications promoting tourism, fishing, and outdoors. Alycia is a member of the Florida Outdoor Writers Association and is actively involved with conservation and fishing non-profit organizations. Visit her personal blog at tideandtale.com or on Instagram @tideandtale.